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Formatting a paper/bibliography: Citing Data, Charts & Illus.

In General - Citing Data Sets ...

Data sets require citations for the same reasons journal articles and other types of publications require citations: to acknowledge the original author/producer and to help other researchers find the resource.

A dataset citation includes all of the same components as any other citation:

  • author,
  • title,
  • year of publication,
  • publisher (for data this is often the archive where it is housed),
  • edition or version, and
  • access information (a URL or other persistent identifier).

Be sure to follow the general citation format for the style manual your professor has asked you to use.  It is always better to provide more information about a resource rather than less!

Booth Library owns the most recent copies of style format guides - they are available at the Library's Information Desk. See also...

Charts or graphs within a magazine or journal article

For Example:

(1) If this is the citation for the article containing a graph or chart or image that you want to reference:

Woodruff, Paul H. 2006. "Educating Engineers to Create a Sustainable Future." Journal of Environmental Engineering 132, no. 4: 434-444. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed December 14, 2007).

(2) Then you would use that article citation as the foundation for a new citation for the graph or chart or image you will be using in your paper, here is the new citation:

Woodruff, Paul H. 2006. "Earth's population." Graph. Journal of Environmental Engineering 132, no. 4: 435. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed December 14, 2007).

Explanation:

In other words in the example above by Professor Woodruff that is titled: "Educating Engineers to Create a Sustainable Future." There is a graph titled "Earth's population."  The second citation illustrates how you could cite just the graph that is embedded in that article.

Citation examples courtesy EBSCO